Brisbane Winter Carnival Abandoned

Brisbane Winter Carnival Abandoned

 

The Brisbane winter carnival has been abandoned due to COVID-19 with Queensland divided into five regions in an attempt to further quarantine the industry from the pandemic.

Racing will be further consolidated into just 15 tracks around the state.

Jockeys will be permitted to ride in only one of the five zones with another eight zones declared as restrictions for trainers and stable staff.

The new arrangements come into effect on Sunday with feature programs to be replaced with standard metropolitan programming.

Any horse which has not entered Queensland by midnight on Sunday will not be permitted to race in the state until further notice.

The thoroughbred regions are:
•    Metro North (Brisbane and Sunshine Coast);
•    Metro South West (Gold Coast, Ipswich and Toowoomba);
•    Darling Downs and SEQ Coast;
•    Central West and Central; and
•    North West and North.

 

 

“The health and safety of our participants, who are presently confronting a challenge like no other is our paramount concern,” said RQ CEO Brendan Parnell.

“These are unprecedented times and they call for unprecedented measures.

“We must do everything within our powers to provide for the 40,000 Queenslanders who participate across the state.

“These are their livelihoods that are at stake.

“By introducing a regional racing model, we are able to further support the Queensland Government’s direction to stay local, reduce non-essential travel and to limit the spread of this insidious virus.

“In this instance, the sheer size of Queensland is advantageous. The state is almost eight times larger than Victoria and twice the size of NSW and this presents racing a unique challenge and opportunity.

“While none of us know what is on the horizon, we can reduce the risk, limit the spread and collectively work together for the greater good.”

“Given the circumstances, it is the right decision to abandon our carnivals,” Mr Parnell said.

“Our carnivals are used as the shop-front to showcase our codes and to attract patrons, and in this current environment, it is not responsible.

“We will of course refund all nomination fees already received for the Future Champions Series that was to be staged at the Brisbane Racing Club.

“With restrictions on inter-state travel, the quality of racing will be diluted. More importantly, however, we will require the funding to be directed to assist our stakeholders in their hour of need.”

In order to implement the regional racing model, RQ will be forced to abandon Sunday’s programmed thoroughbred meetings at the Sunshine Coast Turf Club and the Nanango Race Club.

Thoroughbred racing will recommence at the Mackay Turf Club on Tuesday, March 31 and will be restricted to Central Coast participants.

Go here for more information.

The Brisbane winter carnival has been abandoned due to COVID-19 with Queensland divided into five regions in an attempt to further quarantine the industry from the pandemic.

Racing will be further consolidated into just 15 tracks around the state.

Jockeys will be permitted to ride in only one of the five zones with another eight zones declared as restrictions for trainers and stable staff.

The new arrangements come into effect on Sunday with feature programs to be replaced with standard metropolitan programming.

Any horse which has not entered Queensland by midnight on Sunday will not be permitted to race in the state until further notice.

The thoroughbred regions are:
•    Metro North (Brisbane and Sunshine Coast);
•    Metro South West (Gold Coast, Ipswich and Toowoomba);
•    Darling Downs and SEQ Coast;
•    Central West and Central; and
•    North West and North.

“The health and safety of our participants, who are presently confronting a challenge like no other is our paramount concern,” said RQ CEO Brendan Parnell.

“These are unprecedented times and they call for unprecedented measures.

“We must do everything within our powers to provide for the 40,000 Queenslanders who participate across the state.

“These are their livelihoods that are at stake.

“By introducing a regional racing model, we are able to further support the Queensland Government’s direction to stay local, reduce non-essential travel and to limit the spread of this insidious virus.

“In this instance, the sheer size of Queensland is advantageous. The state is almost eight times larger than Victoria and twice the size of NSW and this presents racing a unique challenge and opportunity.

“While none of us know what is on the horizon, we can reduce the risk, limit the spread and collectively work together for the greater good.”

“Given the circumstances, it is the right decision to abandon our carnivals,” Mr Parnell said.

“Our carnivals are used as the shop-front to showcase our codes and to attract patrons, and in this current environment, it is not responsible.

“We will of course refund all nomination fees already received for the Future Champions Series that was to be staged at the Brisbane Racing Club.

“With restrictions on inter-state travel, the quality of racing will be diluted. More importantly, however, we will require the funding to be directed to assist our stakeholders in their hour of need.”

In order to implement the regional racing model, RQ will be forced to abandon Sunday’s programmed thoroughbred meetings at the Sunshine Coast Turf Club and the Nanango Race Club.

Thoroughbred racing will recommence at the Mackay Turf Club on Tuesday, March 31 and will be restricted to Central Coast participants.

Go here for more information.

 

 

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